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Archive for the ‘Music’ Category

I can’t breathe.  –  Lamekia Dockery

The gentleman I call Daedalus shared this video with me last week, and besides being extremely funny it is absolutely brilliant.  The links above it were provided by Lucy Steigerwald, Joe Setyon, Kevin Wilson, Jesse Walker, Nun Ya, and Tushy Galore, in that order.

From the Archives

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You’re on my property with a gun in your hand, threatening to shoot me, because I’m picking up trash.  –  unnamed cop victim

When Angela Keaton and I were quite stoned one night while she was visiting two weeks ago, she played this video for me and I instantly recognized the guy as the one who did the minor-key “Kiss the Girl” which sounds like the soundtrack to a lesbian bondage scene.  In this one, the key shift actually completely changes the perceived meaning of the song (play it and see if you think I’m wrong).  The links above it were provided by Popehat, Mike Siegel, Radley Balko, Mike Chase, Lauren Chief Elk, and Mark Bennett, in that order.

From the Archives

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If you aren’t already familiar with “Ode to Billie Joe”, the song I featured in yesterday’s column, do yourself a favor and listen to it before continuing to read this one.  For over fifty years, listeners have speculated just what it was that the narrator and Billie Joe threw off of the Tallahatchie Bridge, and Bobbie Gentry – a woman almost as enigmatic as the song that made her famous, who abruptly stopped performing at the height of her fame forty years ago and has barely been heard of since – has steadfastly refused to explain it, or even to comment on the disappointing “solution” used by screenwriter Herman Raucher in the 1976 movie inspired by the song.  Given that she is approaching 80 and is more reclusive than ever, it seems likely she will take the secret to her grave, just as her character in the song apparently did; rather than share her grief with others, the narrator “spen[t] a lot of time pickin’ flowers up on Choctaw Ridge/And drop them into the muddy water off the Tallahatchie Bridge.”  As a young teen, the general consensus among the girls in my circle was that the object thrown into the water was a self-aborted fetus which had resulted from the narrator’s relationship with Billie Joe, and that the overly-sensitive boy had killed himself in a fit of inappropriate guilt, possibly due to being seen by the “nice young preacher, Brother Taylor”.  And while a number of other possibilities have been proposed, and good arguments could be made for some of them, it’s the one from my adolescence that inspired this essay upon my re-listening to the song last week.

Not everyone wants to “shout her abortion” as the activists urge; some prefer not to talk about it, and some may feel shame, sorrow or some more complex mix of emotions and prefer not to discuss the subject at all.  Similarly, while sex workers like me are almost belligerently open about it and others are only out with close friends, still others prefer not to admit their history of sex work to anyone.  Some LGBT people are “out and proud”, some more quietly queer, and some still deeply closeted.  The same range of coping strategies (if that’s even the right phrase) can be seen in relation to kinks or fetishes; mental health issues; a history of rape or sexual abuse; drug use; a criminal record; family issues; and nearly anything else for which guilt or shame, appropriate or not, can be heaped upon an individual by society, family members, or even one’s own psyche.  And while it’s certainly true that repressed shame can lead to all sorts of harmful outcomes (like jumping off of bridges or letting one’s life be consumed by bottled-up grief or anger), and that talking about taboo subjects certainly helps to normalize them, not everyone has the psychological mechanisms or social tools required to “shout” her abortion, discuss her whoredom on television, march in pride parades or display family skeletons in the front yard.  Some people have the psychic anatomy necessary to be honest about subjects that were or still are considered shameful, and some don’t; some may feel comfortable displaying some skeletons and not others (for example, being open about queerness but not about sex work).  And the only person who is qualified to make decisions about which laundry to air and which to pack away in the cedar chest is its owner.  While I would like it if more sex workers were “out”, I have no right to pass judgment on anyone who isn’t; their lives are theirs to live, not mine, and they are the ones who will reap the benefits or suffer the consequences of their decisions.  And the exact same thing is true of every other such secret.  To drag someone’s secrets into the open against their will is an act of psychic violence which could potentially trigger physical violence in some circumstances, which is why outing, “doxxing”, and tattling are condemned by all ethical adults.  Minding one’s own business is a virtue, locked closets should be respected, and sometimes silence really is golden.

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You’re gonna get tased, get on the ground now.  –  murderer Joshua Wang

I’ve been thinking about the Southern Gothic aesthetic a great deal lately (probably because my thoughts often turn to New Orleans in Mardi Gras week), and I realized that though I’ve mentioned this song before, I’ve never featured the video.  It’s probably one of the saddest and most enigmatic of all American popular songs, by one of the most brilliant singer-songwriters the country ever produced.  The links above the video were provided by Franklin Harris, Jesse Walker, Emma Evans, Scott Greenfield, and Phoenix Calida (x2), in that order.

From the Archives

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Every president should be remembered as an infamous and immoral rogue who unjustly claimed to rule many millions by arguments no better than magic.  –  Anthony Comegna

Last week we lost Peter Tork of the Monkees (Davy Jones died in 2012), so I thought it appropriate to feature this song, which was not only written by and named for him, but was the closing theme of the second season of the TV show.  The links above it were provided by Jesse Walker, Eddie J Cunningham, Mirriam Seddiq, Lucy Steigerwald, Franklin Harris, and Scott Greenfield, in that order.

From the Archives

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Facebook might call the cops on you because a bot thought you seemed sad.  –  Elizabeth Nolan Brown

Here’s another of those strange, wonderful Sesame Street videos; I’m honestly not sure how this one escaped being shared here before, but oh well.  The links above it were provided by Emma EvansDave KruegerRadley BalkoMistress MatisseElizabeth N. Brown, and Angela Keaton, in that order.

From the Archives

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Everyone kind of talked about the fact that she licked people.
–  Cheryl McGrady

I was surprised when I stumbled across this video last week, because I was beginning to think I was the only person who remembered Klaatu; the last time I tried to find their albums on Amazon (I guess about a decade ago) I turned up a big zero.  But after watching this video I searched again, and presto!  Two albums on CD to add to my wish list (and if someone gets there before you, don’t be afraid to scroll down for other good stuff you can get me).  The links above the video were provided by Missy MariposaMike SiegelScott GreenfieldDave Krueger (x2), and Tim Cushing, in that order.

From the Archives

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