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Archive for April 27th, 2015

Back Issue: April 2012

They want so badly for there to be a vast international conspiracy of slavers shuttling helpless, wide-eyed ingénues around the world to feed the demand of millions of perverts who just can’t get enough sex with terrified, crying thirteen-year-old girls, that they’re willing to invest huge sums of money and effort and even stake their public reputations on their filthy, lurid fantasies.  –  “Finding What Isn’t There

BUtterfield 8By April, we were nearing the end of a feature that had shaped the blog since the previous July, namely “One Year Ago Today”.  A fair number of posts were direct sequels to those of the year before; “Oscillation“, “They Still Don’t Get It“, “Guided Tour“, “Hard Numbers” and “Stand-Up Guys” all fall into that category.  Others fall into established categories; “What Gets Into a Man…?” was this month’s fictional interlude, and there were four holiday posts: “Easter 2012“, “Walpurgisnacht“,  “Vinalia Urbana” and “Veneralia“.  Two of these were semi-“listicles”; “Walpurgisnact” contained my list of the scariest short stories, and “Vinalia Urbana” a list of aspects of the goddess Venus.  The latter two holidays were Roman ones, and the last contains a link to actual pictures of my pussy.  But while April saw the Pony the orangutan whoreapproach of the end of one tradition, it also marked a couple of beginnings.  Though I had done a few “My Favorite…” columns before, this month’s “My Favorite Books” and “My Favorite Authors” were the first of a monthly series that ran for over a year.  And “Much Ado About Nothing“, my comment on the Cartagena Secret Service prostitution scandal, was the first column which attracted the attention of the national media.

Black AdamThis month had a number of columns which examined the public perception of sex workers; “Held Together With Lies” looked at the bogus statistics used to support “sex trafficking” mythology, “Finding What Isn’t There” ridiculed those who refuse to accept evidence that such beliefs are false, “Ad Scortum” discussed fallacious dismissals of sex workers’ statements, and “Little Boxes” castigated false and artificial distinctions between sex workers.  Related to those are “Never Too Many“, a Friday the 13th column asking readers to speak up for sex workers; “The Notorious Badge“, which listed actresses who have played whores in movies;  “Ruined Maids“, which presented poems about whores; and “An Example to the West“, which explained why Asian and African sex workers are my heroes.

Rounding out the list are “The Rape Question“, which looks at how the crime was politicized; “Feet of Clay“, a look at some of Nick Kristof’s previous debacles; “A Knight There Was“, a reminiscence about my favorite cousin; “Two-Way Street“, an analysis of male-female differences; and “A Necessary Evil“, an explanation of why that government is best that governs least.courtesan and creature

 

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